The free online magazine for news and views from Cradley, Storridge & Mathon
editor@okcradley.com editor@okcradley.com editor: Ken Nason features editor: Harold Armitage
GARDENING  CHAT Let us have your gardening tips and tricks and even host a regular gardening column. We will continue to seek out the most informative videos from the web but feel free to let us have a video tour of your garden or a video of how you do things. Wonderful things smart phones!
This Month’s gardening videos
Send us your garden pictures and or videos
editor@okcradley.com
>
49
May/June 2024
It’s that time of year when the schedules for the 2024 produce show will be available to download to enable you to get your produce and crafts ready for 14th September so watch this space
Gardening in May/June It can still get very cool at night (and dare I say we could still get a few frosts) despite the much needed and long awaited sun and warmth! So – seeds sown last month still need careful nurturing whether on a sunny windowsil or in the greenhouse. Mice got into my greenhouse and ate some of my sweet pea seedlings – outrageous! A hasty visit to Handyman House in Malvern Link for sealant and a Heath Robinson repair job later my greenhouse seems just about mice-free and seedlings are starting to grow. I have had to put shading up as the bright sunshine seems to be a bit of a shock for the emerging seedlings so now the greenhouse is warm but not too bright. Unfortunately ‘damping off’ can sometimes occur and kill emerging seedlings. This is caused by several soil-born fungi and can affect most seedlings causing them to collapse, sometimes covering them in a whitish fungal growth. There is no cure and the seedling will die but there are some steps to help prevent it. Sowing thinly in commercial compost and clean pots/trays, watering lightly with mains water if possible and good air circulation can help. Once true leaves have grown it is time to start pricking out your seedlings. Sowing seeds sometimes tends to be a bit of a scattergun approach with a rather crowded result, so they need to be moved to another tray but spaced out or into individual inserts so they have more room to grow. Hold the seedling by the leaves and gently prise it out of the tray and into the compost in a slightly larger pot or tray and gently press compost around it. Lightly water. Once bigger these seedlings can be potted on individually but more on this next month. Seeds still to be sown include courgettes, squash, runner and French beans, etc. All salad leaves, radish, spring onion, beetroot, turnips, etc., can be sown every fortnight or so to hopefully give more continuous cropping and avoid a glut. Nature does not always oblige and you may still be inundated with dozens of beetroots all at the same time! I have yet to sow root crops apart from potatoes as the soil has not warmed enough to encourage germination, but I hope to do this as soon as possible. When I start to worry that I’m running out of time I look back at my gardening records to see when I sowed certain seeds etc., and generally speaking I find I’m not too late at all. It is really a very good idea to have this aide-memoir, as well as keeping a record in a notebook of what crops well and what doesn’t. Happy Gardening – and let’s hope for much more warm sunshine!
Gillian
okcradley.com
editor@okcradley.com
Let us have your gardening tips and tricks and even host a regular gardening column. We will continue to seek out the most informative videos from the web but feel free to let us have a video tour of your garden or a video of how you do things. Wonderful things smart phones!
Send us your garden pictures and or videos
This Month’s gardening videos
editor@okcradley.com editor: Ken Nason features editor: Harold Armitage
okcradley.com
The free online magazine for news and views from Cradley, Storridge & Mathon
49
June 24
Gardening in May/June It can still get very cool at night (and dare I say we could still get a few frosts) despite the much needed and long awaited sun and warmth! So – seeds sown last month still need careful nurturing whether on a sunny windowsil or in the greenhouse. Mice got into my greenhouse and ate some of my sweet pea seedlings – outrageous! A hasty visit to Handyman House in Malvern Link for sealant and a Heath Robinson repair job later my greenhouse seems just about mice-free and seedlings are starting to grow. I have had to put shading up as the bright sunshine seems to be a bit of a shock for the emerging seedlings so now the greenhouse is warm but not too bright. Unfortunately ‘damping off’ can sometimes occur and kill emerging seedlings. This is caused by several soil-born fungi and can affect most seedlings causing them to collapse, sometimes covering them in a whitish fungal growth. There is no cure and the seedling will die but there are some steps to help prevent it. Sowing thinly in commercial compost and clean pots/trays, watering lightly with mains water if possible and good air circulation can help. Once true leaves have grown it is time to start pricking out your seedlings. Sowing seeds sometimes tends to be a bit of a scattergun approach with a rather crowded result, so they need to be moved to another tray but spaced out or into individual inserts so they have more room to grow. Hold the seedling by the leaves and gently prise it out of the tray and into the compost in a slightly larger pot or tray and gently press compost around it. Lightly water. Once bigger these seedlings can be potted on individually but more on this next month. Seeds still to be sown include courgettes, squash, runner and French beans, etc. All salad leaves, radish, spring onion, beetroot, turnips, etc., can be sown every fortnight or so to hopefully give more continuous cropping and avoid a glut. Nature does not always oblige and you may still be inundated with dozens of beetroots all at the same time! I have yet to sow root crops apart from potatoes as the soil has not warmed enough to encourage germination, but I hope to do this as soon as possible. When I start to worry that I’m running out of time I look back at my gardening records to see when I sowed certain seeds etc., and generally speaking I find I’m not too late at all. It is really a very good idea to have this aide-memoir, as well as keeping a record in a notebook of what crops well and what doesn’t. Happy Gardening – and let’s hope for much more warm sunshine!
Gillian
>
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