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Editor: Ken Nason Features Editor: Harold Armitage Storridge reporter: Vacancy Cradley reporter: Vacancy Mathon reporter: Vacancy
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No 26
Thoughts from the bench
5th January 2022
When I grew up I walked to school and our Dinner time was at a regular time, Sunday’s was a Roast dinner and all the trimmings. Eating out was not heard of, we only had a take away on special occasions, only received a toy on birthdays and at Christmas. Fast food was fish and chips and having a bottle of pop from the shop was a real treat. You took your school clothes off as soon as you got home and put on your 'playing out' clothes. - children looked like children, we didn't pout, wear makeup or have anxiety. There was no taking or picking you up in the car, you walked or rode your bike! Our house had no phone you had to use the local phone box and none of your friends had phones so no one to call anyway We didn’t have, Sky or Netflix, we had only 3 channels to watch. Channel 4 and 5 was an exciting addition! we had to watch all of the adverts unless you switched to BBC. We played Army, cowboys( and Indians), shops, bus conductors, Hide & Seek, Tag, British Bulldog, kick the can, football and cricket, made mud pies, built dens, and Rode our Bikes everywhere giving a crossbar to our friends who didn’t have a bike. Staying in the house was a PUNISHMENT and the only thing we knew about "bored" was --- "You better find something to do before I find it for you!" We ate what mum made for our Dinner or we ate nothing at all. If we rushed our Dinner we weren't allowed to go back out and if we didn't eat it we weren't allowed back out either. Bottled water was not a thing; we drank from the tap( or sometimes the local brook), We watched cartoons on Saturday mornings, and rode our bikes for hours and ran around. We weren't AFRAID OF ANYTHING. We played till dark... street lights were our alarm. If someone had a fight, that's what it was and we were friends again a week later, if not SOONER. We watched our MOUTHS and behaviour around our elders because ALL of our aunts, uncles, grandpas, grandmas, AND our parents' best friends were all extensions of our PARENTS and you didn't want them telling your parents if you misbehaved! Or they would give you something to cry about. Everyone had respect. I did my research by borrowing books from the library or from wise older people. There was no internet and no Google! These were the good days. So many kids today will never know how it feels to be a real kid. I loved my childhood and all the friends I hung around with. Good Times The Best Times of Our lives. Best days of my life. The 60's, 70’s /80’s.
All children need a laptop NOT a computer, but a human laptop. Moms,Dads, Grannies and Grandpas, Aunts, Uncles- someone to hold them, read to them, teach them, loved ones who will embrace them and pass on the experience, rituals and knowledge of a hundred previous generations. Loved ones who will pass on to the next generation their expectations of them, their hopes, and their dreams  Colin Powell
When I grew up I walked to school and our Dinner time was at a regular time, Sunday’s was a Roast dinner and all the trimmings. Eating out was not heard of, we only had a take away on special occasions, only received a toy on birthdays and at Christmas. Fast food was fish and chips and having a bottle of pop from the shop was a real treat. You took your school clothes off as soon as you got home and put on your 'playing out' clothes. - children looked like children, we didn't pout, wear makeup or have anxiety. There was no taking or picking you up in the car, you walked or rode your bike! Our house had no phone you had to use the local phone box and none of your friends had phones so no one to call anyway We didn’t have, Sky or Netflix, we had only 3 channels to watch. Channel 4 and 5 was an exciting addition! we had to watch all of the adverts unless you switched to BBC. We played Army, cowboys( and Indians), shops, bus conductors, Hide & Seek, Tag, British Bulldog, kick the can, football and cricket, made mud pies, built dens, and Rode our Bikes everywhere giving a crossbar to our friends who didn’t have a bike. Staying in the house was a PUNISHMENT and the only thing we knew about "bored" was --- "You better find something to do before I find it for you!" We ate what mum made for our Dinner or we ate nothing at all. If we rushed our Dinner we weren't allowed to go back out and if we didn't eat it we weren't allowed back out either. Bottled water was not a thing; we drank from the tap( or sometimes the local brook), We watched cartoons on Saturday mornings, and rode our bikes for hours and ran around. We weren't AFRAID OF ANYTHING. We played till dark... street lights were our alarm. If someone had a fight, that's what it was and we were friends again a week later, if not SOONER. We watched our MOUTHS and behaviour around our elders because ALL of our aunts, uncles, grandpas, grandmas, AND our parents' best friends were all extensions of our PARENTS and you didn't want them telling your parents if you misbehaved! Or they would give you something to cry about. Everyone had respect. I did my research by borrowing books from the library or from wise older people. There was no internet and no Google! These were the good days. So many kids today will never know how it feels to be a real kid. I loved my childhood and all the friends I hung around with. Good Times The Best Times of Our lives. Best days of my life. The 60's, 70’s /80’s.
The online magazine for Cradley, Storridge & Mathon
editor@okcradley.com
Editor: Ken Nason Feature Editor: Harrold Armitage Correspondents: Storridge Reporter: Vacancy Cradley Reporter: Vacancy Mathon Reporter: Vacancy
Thoughts from the bench
5th January 2022
No 26
Contents
All children need a laptop NOT a computer, but a human laptop. Moms,Dads, Grannies and Grandpas, Aunts, Uncles- someone to hold them, read to them, teach them, loved ones who will embrace them and pass on the experience, rituals and knowledge of a hundred previous generations. Loved ones who will pass on to the next generation their expectations of them, their hopes, and their dreams  Colin Powell