The free online magazine for news and views from Cradley, Storridge & Mathon
editor@okcradley.com editor@okcradley.com editor: Ken Nason features editor: Harold Armitage
If you have a question you’ve always wanted to ask let us know and we will hopefully provide enlightenment for you
Are we heading for extinction?
What is the minimum number of people in isolation that would be required to survive and grow ? Determining the minimum viable population size for humans to survive and grow is a complex question that depends on numerous factors, including genetic diversity, environmental conditions, available resources, social dynamics, and technological capabilities. However, there are estimates and guidelines provided by conservation biologists and geneticists for other species that might offer some insight. The concept of a minimum viable population (MVP) is often used in conservation biology to estimate the smallest population size necessary to prevent extinction due to inbreeding depression, genetic drift, and other factors. For humans, the absolute minimum number of individuals needed to ensure long-term survival and growth is uncertain, but it's likely to be much larger than for most other species due to our complex social structures, technological dependencies, and genetic diversity requirements. Estimates for minimum viable population sizes for humans vary widely. Some researchers suggest numbers in the thousands to tens of thousands, while others propose that a few hundred individuals might suffice under ideal conditions, but this would be a precarious situation with minimal genetic diversity. Factors influencing the minimum viable population size for humans include: Genetic Diversity: A larger population size helps maintain genetic diversity, reducing the risk of inbreeding and genetic disorders. Social Structure: Human societies rely on social structures for cooperation, division of labor, and cultural transmission. A larger population can support more complex social dynamics. Technological Dependence: Humans depend on technology for survival and comfort. A larger population can support the development and maintenance of technology. Resource Availability: The availability of resources such as food, water, shelter, and energy sources can limit population growth. Environmental Stability: Stable environmental conditions reduce the risk of catastrophic events that could threaten small populations. Given these considerations, while it's challenging to provide a precise number, it's clear that a sustainable human population would need to be significantly larger than just a few hundred individuals, likely ranging into the thousands or tens of thousands at a minimum.
okcradley.com
48
Apr 2024
The Thinker
editor@okcradley.com
The Thinker
editor@okcradley.com editor: Ken Nason features editor: Harold Armitage
okcradley.com
The free online magazine for news and views from Cradley, Storridge & Mathon
48
April 24
If you have a question you’ve always wanted to ask let us know and we will hopefully provide enlightenment for you
Are we heading for extinction??
What is the minimum number of people in isolation that would be required to survive and grow ? Determining the minimum viable population size for humans to survive and grow is a complex question that depends on numerous factors, including genetic diversity, environmental conditions, available resources, social dynamics, and technological capabilities. However, there are estimates and guidelines provided by conservation biologists and geneticists for other species that might offer some insight. The concept of a minimum viable population (MVP) is often used in conservation biology to estimate the smallest population size necessary to prevent extinction due to inbreeding depression, genetic drift, and other factors. For humans, the absolute minimum number of individuals needed to ensure long-term survival and growth is uncertain, but it's likely to be much larger than for most other species due to our complex social structures, technological dependencies, and genetic diversity requirements. Estimates for minimum viable population sizes for humans vary widely. Some researchers suggest numbers in the thousands to tens of thousands, while others propose that a few hundred individuals might suffice under ideal conditions, but this would be a precarious situation with minimal genetic diversity. Factors influencing the minimum viable population size for humans include: Genetic Diversity: A larger population size helps maintain genetic diversity, reducing the risk of inbreeding and genetic disorders. Social Structure: Human societies rely on social structures for cooperation, division of labor, and cultural transmission. A larger population can support more complex social dynamics. Technological Dependence: Humans depend on technology for survival and comfort. A larger population can support the development and maintenance of technology. Resource Availability: The availability of resources such as food, water, shelter, and energy sources can limit population growth. Environmental Stability: Stable environmental conditions reduce the risk of catastrophic events that could threaten small populations. Given these considerations, while it's challenging to provide a precise number, it's clear that a sustainable human population would need to be significantly larger than just a few hundred individuals, likely ranging into the thousands or tens of thousands at a minimum.